RecoverED

You've made it to the eating disorder support and awareness blog. Struggling? This blog is for you as a source of support, so you know your not alone. Know someone struggling? This blog is for you, so you can learn tools to help your loved one.
***DISCLAIMER*** We are not doctors, and cannot/will not diagnose or treat you for any illness. We encourage you to talk to a doctor about medical concerns.

(We cannot follow back from this blog)
  • agent-hardass:

    Recovery Record is the smart companion for managing your journey to recovery from eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, obsessive eating disorder, binge eating disorder and compulsive eating disorder.



    With Recovery Record you can:

    - Keep a record of meals, thoughts and feelings 
    - Access beautiful reflection images and affirmations
    - Customize log questions, meal plans, coping tactics and recovery goals
    - View charts that highlight insights, trends and progress
    - Collect jigsaw pieces to earn hidden rewards
    - Set personalized reminder schedules and alarm tones
    - Complete questionnaires to track your progress
    - Link with your treatment team 
    - Receive in-the-moment feedback and messages from your treatment team
    - Receive and send encouragement messages and virtual gifts to/from other users

    Android

    iTunes

  • Q: I feel like a failure and a fake... I was diagnosed as EDNOS after a stay in residential psych treatment, but I'm not underweight. I'm not even skinny. I feel like I need to restrict to prove myself. You don't need to answer; I just wanted to tell someone.


    A:

    I’m sorry it took so long to get back. I’ve been ya know, not here. Emotionally and in the online sense. 

    1. You are not a failure. Your worth is not measured in your weight, your “success” in your disordered habits, or in a diagnoses. Those do not make up a human being, just as the fact that I cut off my hair and it’s taking forever to grow back out doesn’t make me less of a person. 


    2. You don’t have to underweight to have an eating disorder. Eating disorder diagnoses are based, primarily, on behavior and thought patterns. You think like a person with an eating disorder does. Therefor, you have one. Who mainly helps you with your treatment? A physician or a psychologist? A psychologist. That’s because eating disorders are of the mind. They just happen to affect the body too. But that’s what makes them so dangerous. 

    3. Let it go. Let go of the idea of proving yourself. You don’t need to prove yourself. You need to keep yourself healthy. 

    I wish I knew how to help you more. I hope your recovery is going well.

  • lokahsamasta:

a-recovered-life:

(Chart from Almost Anorexic by Jennifer Thomas & Jenni Schafer)
Don’t settle for less!  FULL recovery is ALWAYS an option!

    lokahsamasta:

    a-recovered-life:

    (Chart from Almost Anorexic by Jennifer Thomas & Jenni Schafer)

    Don’t settle for less!  FULL recovery is ALWAYS an option!

  • Less Commonly Known Eating Disorders

    Orthorexiadefined as an obsession with “healthy or righteous eating.”

    • An individual dealing with Orthorexia fixates on defining the “right” foods, foods that can be safely eaten. 
    • They will spend just as much time and energy thinking about food as someone with Bulimia or Anorexia. They may not think about calories, but they think about the overall “health benefits” and how the food was processed, prepared, etc.  Individuals with Orthorexia tend not to eat out as much because they do not trust the preparation of foods other than what they have prepared.
    • The obsession for healthy foods could come from a number of sources such as family habits, society trends, economic problems, recent illness, or even just hearing something negative about a food type or group, which then leads them to ultimately eliminate the food or foods from their diet.
    • Something to keep in mind: The severe restrictive nature of Orthorexia has the potential to morph into Anorexia. 

    Bigorexiaa disorder in which a person constantly obsesses and/or worries about being too small, underdeveloped, and/or underweight.

    • Typically those that have Bigorexia are not frail or underdeveloped at all.  They actually have large muscle mass and will obsess about having the perfect physique.  They will believe their muscles are inadequate. Bigorexia has also been known as muscle dysmorphia, Reverse Anorexia, or Adonis Complex. 
    • This disorder is a form of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and is related to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Those with Bigorexia constantly obsess over their imperfections, further distorting their perception of themselves.  This will significantly impair the person’s mood often causing depression or feelings of disgust.
    • Both men and women can be affected by this disorder, although men are most susceptible.

    Night Eating Syndromeprimarily characterizes an ongoing, persistent pattern of late-night binge eating. The individual may not be aware at the time of what they are doing when they are eating. 

    • Unlike binge eating, which is done in relatively short episodes, NES involves continual eating throughout the evening.  

    There are of course more than just these… but they are a few of the less commonly known eating disorders. Anorexia and bulimia are not the only eating disorders out there.

    For more information on these and other eating disorders, go to Alliance for Eating Disorders and search the LEFT column for different types.

  • recoveryninja:

    Eating 2300+ calories every single day for weeks on end & I have not become a ‘whale’ or an ‘elephant’ or any other poor innocent mamal that is associated with being ‘fat’ or ‘overweight’. I have gained 4kg in 4 weeks but do I have ‘rolls’ or ‘lumps’ of fat…NO

    In weight gain, food is used to restore your organs, make your hair grow thicker, make your nails grow, make you have more energy, make you warmer, make you regain muscle etc…it is not all about the appearance.

    I still have a few more kg to go but that won’t make a huge difference. I am so much healthier now & although some of you may think ‘oh you still have a slight thigh gap so you can’t be nearly at weight resotoration’ some people do naturally have small thigh gaps due to the way their hip structure is. I have always been that way & so please no tumblr police.

    I was asked to do this & just thought I might as well as I had just weighed myself & saw how much I had gained. I honestly did not care. I did not have a rush of anxiety, or tremble or cry or even get ed thoughts flooding into my mind. I just stepped off the scale, walked out of the bathroom & went back down into the living room to post this.

    Do not fear weight gain, it is a natural proccess & your body is immensly clever. It has a set weight for you & whether you eat more one day it will not suddenly gain weight. Our bodies are far more intelligent than we give them credit for.  

  • tristanns:

    What Guys Look For In Girls - a response to Nash Grier’s “What Guys Look For In Girls” video

  • letting-go-is-freedom:

runningoffyourproblems:

Olivia had always wanted to be healthier. Last month she decided to take action and announced her life-changing intentions: She was going to get eight hours of sleep every night, study harder in school, eat better, and work out every day. While writing up her meal plan for the week, she started doing some research. “Oh gosh… There are so many empty calories in this soda… I’m not going to drink it ever again!” That was a month ago. First, it was soda. Then it was chips. Chocolate, donuts, bread, pasta, starchy vegetables, and candy soon followed. Then nuts. Avocados. Fish. Meat. Dairy. Gluten. Olivia sat at her dorm room desk and looked at her dinner: A sliced and skinned apple, ice water, and a celery stick. “I’m so proud of how healthy I’ve become…” she thought as she brought the glass of water to her lips.
What is Orthorexia?
Orthorexia Nervosa is the unhealthy obsession with healthy eating. It comes from the Greek “orthos,“ meaning ‘right’ or ‘correct’ and “orexis,” ‘appetite.’ While it is not a disorder recognized by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (The DSM-IV), many psychologists believe it’s about time it was.
How can someone be unhealthy if they’re obsessed with healthy foods?
Orthorexia begins as an innocent attempt at improving one’s lifestyle, achieving health, and preventing illness.
People suffering from an Orthorexic mentality have a variety of foods they deem pure and acceptable. While at first they may cut out truly less healthy foods such as soda, their list becomes smaller and smaller until the individual is at a high risk for developing Anorexia Nervosa.
If an individual is less informed about nutrition and dietetics, their “safe list” may severely limit macronutrients (protein, fats, carbs) or calories. The individual develops an extreme fear of what they deem to be unhealthy, whether it’s traditionally considered unhealthy or not.
Wait, I don’t get that last part?
The interesting thing about Orthorexia is that the disorder exists completely by the individual’s standards of what is healthy. For example, the individual may refuse avocado because it is high in fat but accept a 100-calorie snack pack of processed food because it’s low in calories.
Is Orthorexia like Anorexia?
Orthorexics can be (but they’re usually not) physically healthy. Mentally, their sense of self and food is warped, but physically they can be in a normal body weight range, have an adequate intake of a variety of foods, and not suffer from any nutritional deficiencies. Anorexia is characterized by the extreme restricting of food and it is nearly impossible to be healthy under such circumstances. Anorexia is quantity of food, Orthorexia is quality. 
Orthorexia can turn into anorexia if what they individual deems healthy only includes one or two foods, or less. The disorder usually begins with good intentions (“I want to be healthier,” “I want to lose weight,” etc.) but the mind is soon consumed with calorie counting, label reading, and the pursuit of unachievable perfection.
Both Orthorexia and Anorexia often bring with them the comorbidities of anxiety and/or OCD.  Both disorders involve one spending a large portion of their day avoiding food and planning meals.
Who can suffer from Orthorexia?
Literally anyone can have an Orthorexic mentality. Those most at risk are medical students, nutrition students, and adolescents. Type A personalities, perfectionists, and overachievers are always at a higher risk of developing eating disorders.
What do I do if I have an eating disorder?
Get help immediately. Talk with a trusted adult (or if you are an adult seek a physician or therapist, whichever you’re more comfortable with) and plan steps for action. Medical or professional help may save your life. 
More Information: X, X, X, X
Eating Disorder Help & Support: X

Finally

    letting-go-is-freedom:

    runningoffyourproblems:

    Olivia had always wanted to be healthier. Last month she decided to take action and announced her life-changing intentions: She was going to get eight hours of sleep every night, study harder in school, eat better, and work out every day. While writing up her meal plan for the week, she started doing some research. “Oh gosh… There are so many empty calories in this soda… I’m not going to drink it ever again!” That was a month ago. First, it was soda. Then it was chips. Chocolate, donuts, bread, pasta, starchy vegetables, and candy soon followed. Then nuts. Avocados. Fish. Meat. Dairy. Gluten. Olivia sat at her dorm room desk and looked at her dinner: A sliced and skinned apple, ice water, and a celery stick. “I’m so proud of how healthy I’ve become…” she thought as she brought the glass of water to her lips.

    What is Orthorexia?

    Orthorexia Nervosa is the unhealthy obsession with healthy eating. It comes from the Greek “orthos,“ meaning ‘right’ or ‘correct’ and “orexis,” ‘appetite.’ While it is not a disorder recognized by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (The DSM-IV), many psychologists believe it’s about time it was.

    How can someone be unhealthy if they’re obsessed with healthy foods?

    Orthorexia begins as an innocent attempt at improving one’s lifestyle, achieving health, and preventing illness.

    People suffering from an Orthorexic mentality have a variety of foods they deem pure and acceptable. While at first they may cut out truly less healthy foods such as soda, their list becomes smaller and smaller until the individual is at a high risk for developing Anorexia Nervosa.

    If an individual is less informed about nutrition and dietetics, their “safe list” may severely limit macronutrients (protein, fats, carbs) or calories. The individual develops an extreme fear of what they deem to be unhealthy, whether it’s traditionally considered unhealthy or not.

    Wait, I don’t get that last part?

    The interesting thing about Orthorexia is that the disorder exists completely by the individual’s standards of what is healthy. For example, the individual may refuse avocado because it is high in fat but accept a 100-calorie snack pack of processed food because it’s low in calories.

    Is Orthorexia like Anorexia?

    Orthorexics can be (but they’re usually not) physically healthy. Mentally, their sense of self and food is warped, but physically they can be in a normal body weight range, have an adequate intake of a variety of foods, and not suffer from any nutritional deficiencies. Anorexia is characterized by the extreme restricting of food and it is nearly impossible to be healthy under such circumstances. Anorexia is quantity of food, Orthorexia is quality. 

    Orthorexia can turn into anorexia if what they individual deems healthy only includes one or two foods, or less. The disorder usually begins with good intentions (“I want to be healthier,” “I want to lose weight,” etc.) but the mind is soon consumed with calorie counting, label reading, and the pursuit of unachievable perfection.

    Both Orthorexia and Anorexia often bring with them the comorbidities of anxiety and/or OCD.  Both disorders involve one spending a large portion of their day avoiding food and planning meals.

    Who can suffer from Orthorexia?

    Literally anyone can have an Orthorexic mentality. Those most at risk are medical students, nutrition students, and adolescents. Type A personalities, perfectionists, and overachievers are always at a higher risk of developing eating disorders.

    What do I do if I have an eating disorder?

    Get help immediately. Talk with a trusted adult (or if you are an adult seek a physician or therapist, whichever you’re more comfortable with) and plan steps for action. Medical or professional help may save your life. 

    More Information: X, X, X, X

    Eating Disorder Help & Support: X

    Finally

  • fragileminded:

knightfury195:

findmotivation-justdoit:

16nite:

Please reblog so people will know. 

This^^

My height makes me halfway between adorable and bright :)

Forever reblog.

    fragileminded:

    knightfury195:

    findmotivation-justdoit:

    16nite:

    Please reblog so people will know. 

    This^^

    My height makes me halfway between adorable and bright :)

    Forever reblog.

  • Trying to fight, to float, to swim.: Help! I binged! What do I do now?!

    recoveryisbeautiful:

    First, know your binge. What caused it? How could you have better handled it? What alternatives are there to bingeing? What KIND of binge was it?

    Subjective vs. Objective Binges

  • eatcleanmakechanges:

s-taymotivated:

How to Bounce back after a Binge!

1. Don’t purge. I know it’s really hard to hold back from it, especially if you’ve done it before, but it will not benefit you in any way.
2. Don’t reduce your calorie intake for tomorrow (or any of the days following) to nothing. It might seem like a logical plan, but if you restrict tomorrow, you’ll never get into a normal cycle of eating. You’ll be constantly ricocheting between binge and purge, starve and binge, purge and starve. You’ll never be eating normally.
3. Remember that it takes 3500 EXCESS calories to gain a pound. This means 3500 calories on top of what your body already requires to function on a day-to-day basis. It’s highly unlikely your stomach can even hold this much, much less double that, so it’s very unlikely you’ll gain more than two pounds from this! Your progress is not back at zero. Your efforts so far are not null. This is just a little bump in the road.
4. Put on comfy clothes. Honestly. Tight clothes will just make you feel worse. Feeling bad = more binging. Take off those tight jeans, and put on some cozy sweats.
5. Use your binge as a learning experience. What triggered it? Did you feel out of control? Did you actually want all the food you were eating, or were you just eating for eating’s sake? Did you even like the taste of some of it? Do you think you binged because you deprived yourself of a treat you wanted earlier? Did you binge because you’ve been starving all day and just couldn’t take it anymore? Try and understand your binge, understand what your mind went through when your hands were reaching for all that food. The more you can understand the reasons behind your binge, the better you’ll be next time at preventing them—when you’re standing in the middle of a binge, it actually has nothing to do with willpower, it’s usually the result of decisions you made much earlier. For more information on how your brain can trick you into binging when its not getting enough nutrients, click here and here.
6. Remember that you are NOT a failure, bad for eating, undeserving of life, or ugly because you decided to give yourself what you really wanted.
Now for the fun part.
Tomorrow, wake up all bright and sunny. Leap right out of bed (Note: when wondering how to get out of bed, the answer is always “leap.”) Have a delicious bowl of healthy for breakfast and get really excited about feeling awesome all day because of all the healthy food you’re going to bless your body with. Take a walk, if you’d like to. Smile all day long. Drink some water. 
But don’t purge and don’t restrict. Eat how you’d normally eat, cause you’re a normal eating healthy person who does not fall prey to freak eating cycles. You don’t need that shit, look at you, you’re hot as hell.


COPY this to your phone.

    eatcleanmakechanges:

    s-taymotivated:

    How to Bounce back after a Binge!

    1. Don’t purge. I know it’s really hard to hold back from it, especially if you’ve done it before, but it will not benefit you in any way.

    2. Don’t reduce your calorie intake for tomorrow (or any of the days following) to nothing. It might seem like a logical plan, but if you restrict tomorrow, you’ll never get into a normal cycle of eating. You’ll be constantly ricocheting between binge and purge, starve and binge, purge and starve. You’ll never be eating normally.

    3. Remember that it takes 3500 EXCESS calories to gain a pound. This means 3500 calories on top of what your body already requires to function on a day-to-day basis. It’s highly unlikely your stomach can even hold this much, much less double that, so it’s very unlikely you’ll gain more than two pounds from this! Your progress is not back at zero. Your efforts so far are not null. This is just a little bump in the road.

    4. Put on comfy clothes. Honestly. Tight clothes will just make you feel worse. Feeling bad = more binging. Take off those tight jeans, and put on some cozy sweats.

    5. Use your binge as a learning experience. What triggered it? Did you feel out of control? Did you actually want all the food you were eating, or were you just eating for eating’s sake? Did you even like the taste of some of it? Do you think you binged because you deprived yourself of a treat you wanted earlier? Did you binge because you’ve been starving all day and just couldn’t take it anymore? Try and understand your binge, understand what your mind went through when your hands were reaching for all that food. The more you can understand the reasons behind your binge, the better you’ll be next time at preventing them—when you’re standing in the middle of a binge, it actually has nothing to do with willpower, it’s usually the result of decisions you made much earlier. For more information on how your brain can trick you into binging when its not getting enough nutrients, click here and here.

    6. Remember that you are NOT a failure, bad for eating, undeserving of life, or ugly because you decided to give yourself what you really wanted.

    Now for the fun part.

    Tomorrow, wake up all bright and sunny. Leap right out of bed (Note: when wondering how to get out of bed, the answer is always “leap.”) Have a delicious bowl of healthy for breakfast and get really excited about feeling awesome all day because of all the healthy food you’re going to bless your body with. Take a walk, if you’d like to. Smile all day long. Drink some water. 

    But don’t purge and don’t restrict. Eat how you’d normally eat, cause you’re a normal eating healthy person who does not fall prey to freak eating cycles. You don’t need that shit, look at you, you’re hot as hell.

    COPY this to your phone.

  • just-a-skinny-boy:

    This is a sign that you really are important to this world.

  • Repeat after me:
    I am not a problem

    to be solved. Repeat after me:
    I am worthy I am worthy I am

    neither the mistake nor
    the punishment.

    Sierra DeMulder (via ampersandrearasmussen)

    • Reality Check: There will always be someone thinner than you, no matter how thin you are. Aiming to be the "thinnest" "sickest" "worst" is a pointless goal because you will never achieve it.
    • Reality Check: Eating at night/in the morning/after working out/before working out/at someone's house/in front of people/more than your sister/even if you just ate an hour ago/more than X times per day will NOT make you gain weight. Weight gain is about calories in vs. calories out, not about where/when/what/in from of whom you eat.
    • Reality Check: Fat is not bad. Fat is necessary in order to absorb calcium and many other nutrients. Fat is part of a balanced diet.
    • Reality Check: Sugar is not bad either. Sugar helps balance cravings. If you completely avoid sugar, your cravings will only get stronger. Eat sugar when you crave it to avoid binging on it.
    • Reality Check: What you see in the mirror is probably distorted. Instead of body checking, create affirmations for yourself. I am strong. I am brave. I am compassionate. I am loved.
    • Reality Check: People care about you. I can guarantee someone out there does. Someone loves you and cares about you and it's killing someone out there to see you hate yourself and hurt yourself. Even when you think you're completely and utterly alone, you're not. Because I care and if you ever need someone, I'm here.
RecoverED

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